WyoHistory.org

The Online Encyclopedia of Wyoming History

Geology & Natural History

Browse Articles about Geology & Natural History

1 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z
Title Author
Seminoe Dam, History of Annette Hein
Teton Forest Reserve John Clayton
Uranium business, history of in Wyoming Chamois L. Andersen, Lori Van Pelt
Wildlife, Wind River Indian Reservation Gregory Nickerson
Wind River Indian Reservation, wildlife on Gregory Nickerson
Wyoming eclipses Rebecca Hein
Yellowstone Forest Reserve John Clayton

Pages

Geology & Natural History

Colby Mammoth Site

Remains of at least seven mammoths, probably from a meat cache dating back more than 11,000 years, were found when the Colby Mammoth site east of Worland, Wyo., was excavated by a crew under Wyoming State Archaeologist George Frison in the 1970s.

The North Platte River Basin: A Natural History

The basin of the North Platte River takes up the southeastern quarter of Wyoming, plus a finger of land along the tributary Sweetwater River in the center of the state. The courses of the North Platte and Sweetwater determined early fur-trade and emigrant routes. Since that time, the basin’s water and other resources have continued to draw industry, stock raising, dams and irrigation—and people.

Pages

Encyclopedia | Legend Rock, about 30 miles northwest of Thermopolis, Wyo., features nearly 300 images carved or pecked into a rock cliff by ancient peoples over thousands of years.
Encyclopedia | Medicine Lodge State Archaeological Site, northeast of Hyattville, contains pictographs and petroglyphs left by Wyoming’s ancient people, as well as an attractive, state-run campsite and small museum. Archaeologists have found evidence at the site of human habitation stretching back 10,000 years.
Encyclopedia | The basin of the North Platte River takes up the southeastern quarter of Wyoming, plus a finger of land along the tributary Sweetwater River in the center of the state. The courses of the North Platte and Sweetwater determined early fur-trade and emigrant routes. Since that time, the basin’s water and other resources have continued to draw industry, stock raising, dams and irrigation—and people.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Geology & Natural History