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The Online Encyclopedia of Wyoming History

Douglas R. Cubbison

Douglas R. Cubbison

Douglas R. Cubbison, Acting Director and Curator for the Wyoming Veterans Memorial Museum in Casper, Wyo., has published nine books on military history topics and one historic novel. Doug is the President of the Wyoming State Historical Society. He also serves as sheriff of the Casper Posse of Westerners International, on the board of the Fort Caspar Museum Association, and on the board of advisors for the American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming. He is currently working on his next history, on the role of the U.S. Army in Wyoming and Montana during the Indian Wars period.

Encyclopedia | When troops of the U.S. 11th Infantry arrived at their new post, Fort D.A. Russell, near Cheyenne, Wyo., in 1904, they brought with them two church bells—war trophies of recent bitter fighting in the Philippines. The Bells of Balangiga still stand at F.E. Warren Air Force Base. 
Encyclopedia | Wyoming sent four infantry companies and an artillery battery to the Philippines in 1898 during the Spanish-American War. The troops saw minor skirmishes against Filipino insurgents after the Spanish were defeated. All told, three Wyoming troops were killed, 12 died of disease and 75 more were discharged due to wounds or illness.
Encyclopedia | Wyoming soldier, artist, bugler and wolf killer George Ostrom joined the National Guard in 1913 and in 1918 found himself serving with an artillery regiment in the Great War. While in France he sketched vivid combat scenes but is best remembered for his design of Wyoming’s famed bucking-horse logo, modeled on his beloved sorrel, Redwing.
Encyclopedia | In a U.S. Army career spanning three wars and four decades, Paul Kendall, of Sheridan, Wyo., never forgot the moment when his platoon, guarding a Siberian rail link, was attacked one night at 30 below—by an armored train full of Bolshevik partisans.
Encyclopedia | From Union Army soldier to teamster to Guernsey, Wyo., town father, John “Posey” Ryan earned a reputation as an honorable man. But his life’s path took a wrong turn when, believing they had stolen his livelihood, he publicly shot his wife and her daughter to death.
Encyclopedia | In 1854, a year of heavy traffic on the Oregon Trail, Fort Laramie was woefully undermanned, tribes were hungry and tensions were growing. That August, in a dispute over a strayed cow, a reckless young West Pointer ignited a war with the Lakota Sioux that would last a generation.
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