WyoHistory.org

The Online Encyclopedia of Wyoming History

James H. Nottage

James H. Nottage

James H. Nottage holds BA and MA degrees in history from the University of Wyoming. He is chief curator emeritus of the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art in Indianapolis and was founding chief curator of the Autry Museum in Los Angeles. Nottage is completing a volume on the history of what is now Wyoming between 1862 and 1866 with a focus on the Oregon, Overland, Bridger, and Bozeman Trails and the military and civilian communities associated with them.

Grass Skirts and Steel Guitars: The Wyoming Craze for Hawaiian Music

Hawaiian cowboys, competing at Frontier Days in 1908, kicked off Wyoming’s Hawaiian music (and culture) craze. The “paniolo” dominated the world championships that year. Wyomingites bought ukeleles, phonographs and records and attended Hawaiian plays, musicals, dances and concerts for decades. Interest was still strong well into the 1950s.

Spreading the Gospel: Lutheran Missionaries at Deer Creek, 1859-1864

Beginning in 1858, a group of Iowa-based German Lutherans worked to establish a ministry on Deer Creek near present Glenrock, Wyo. Plagued by sparse funding and widening Indian wars, the effort finally collapsed. Three converted Cheyenne boys returned to Iowa with the missionaries and died there; their families never knew what happened to them.

Encyclopedia | Hawaiian cowboys, competing at Frontier Days in 1908, kicked off Wyoming’s Hawaiian music (and culture) craze. The “paniolo” dominated the world championships that year. Wyomingites bought ukeleles, phonographs and records and attended Hawaiian plays, musicals, dances and concerts for decades. Interest was still strong well into the 1950s.
Encyclopedia | Thomas Twiss, West Point class of 1826, came to Fort Laramie as a civilian in 1855, tasked with keeping government promises to tribes and keeping peace in all directions. He had an Oglala family on Deer Creek in addition to a family back East—and lived in two worlds for decades.
Encyclopedia | Beginning in 1858, a group of Iowa-based German Lutherans worked to establish a ministry on Deer Creek near present Glenrock, Wyo. Plagued by sparse funding and widening Indian wars, the effort finally collapsed. Three converted Cheyenne boys returned to Iowa with the missionaries and died there; their families never knew what happened to them.
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