WyoHistory.org

The Online Encyclopedia of Wyoming History

Tom Rea

Tom Rea lives in Casper, Wyo., where he is editor and co-founder, with the Wyoming State Historical Society, of WyoHistory.org. He worked for many years in the newspaper business. The University of Pittsburgh Press in fall 2021 published a new, 20th anniversary edition of his book Bone Wars: The Excavation and Celebrity of Andrew Carnegie’s Dinosaur, which includes a foreword by Carnegie Museum paleontologist Matt Lamanna and a new afterword by the author. Other books include Devil’s Gate: Owning the Land, Owning the Story (University of Oklahoma Press, 2006, 2012) and The Hole in the Wall Ranch: A History (Pronghorn Press, 2010). For more on Tom and what WyoHistory.org is all about, click here to see a half-hour interview on Wyoming PBS.

A Kid in Hell on Wheels: Laramie as the Railroad Arrived

Billy Owen never saw a railroad until he was eight years old. His mother had told him about railroads. But in his mind as he traveled east by wagon train across Wyoming in the spring of 1868, he had imagined railroad wheels that looked something like wagon wheels. They rolled in grooves. Each groove was made by two rails. That meant it took four rails, as he imagined it, to make a track.

Gathering the Tribes: The Cheyennes Come Together after Sand Creek

The Tongue River in northern Wyoming must have been as beautiful as it is now when George Bent saw it in 1865, with big, lazy curves under cottonwoods, the grass thickening on its banks and the trees sending out their first green shoots in early May. Nowadays, irrigated hay fields and the tiny towns of Dayton and Ranchester lie along the river. In May of 1865, however, one stretch of it was packed with human beings. That month, there was as large a town on the Tongue as that river has ever seen.

Pictures on Rock: What Pictographs and Petroglyphs Say about the People Who Made Them

The earliest people appear to have come to Wyoming from Asia about 11,000 years ago and archaeologists now think there’s a good chance the people were direct ancestors of Shoshone people who live in Wyoming now. In recent years, the mostly white archaeologists have realized it makes sense to ask Shoshone people for help understanding the pictures and carvings their ancestors left on the rocks.

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Encyclopedia | The earliest people appear to have come to Wyoming from Asia about 11,000 years ago and archaeologists now think there’s a good chance the people were direct ancestors of Shoshone people who live in Wyoming now. In recent years, the mostly white archaeologists have realized it makes sense to ask Shoshone people for help understanding the pictures and carvings their ancestors left on the rocks.

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