WyoHistory.org

The Online Encyclopedia of Wyoming History

Doug McInnis

Doug McInnis

Doug McInnis writes about science, business, and history from his base in Casper, Wyo. He has written for the New York Times, Popular Science and scores of special-interest and university magazines.

W. Edwards Deming of Powell, Wyo.: The Man Who Helped Shape the World

W. Edwards Deming grew up in difficult financial circumstances in Powell, Wyo., early in the 20th century. Still, he worked his way through the University of Wyoming and Yale and became absorbed by statistics as a way to solve problems. After World War II, he shared his ideas on efficiency with Japanese manufacturers eager to rebuild their shattered economy. The Japanese used that knowledge to flip the global economy on its head and beat U.S. industry at its own game.

Encyclopedia | Sixteen years after Congress passed the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967, Wyoming became the 49th state to view public television. Surviving on shoestring budgets of federal, state and private funds, donated equipment and volunteer pledge drives, Wyoming PBS managed to expand across the state—and finally to thrive.
Encyclopedia | Converse County, Wyo., lists Triceratops discoveries and the annual Wyoming State Fair among its claims to fame. As happened with many of the state’s counties, the economic commerce created by the arrival of the railroad brought more people and more possibilities to the area.
Encyclopedia | The JC Penney Company, long among the world’s largest department store chains, traces its roots to a one-room shop in a small Wyoming coal-mining town at the turn of the last century. Penney’s career in Wyoming lasted just a decade, but in 1902, Wyoming provided exactly what young Penney needed to found a chain that has survived, as of 2011, for 109 years.
Encyclopedia | W. Edwards Deming grew up in difficult financial circumstances in Powell, Wyo., early in the 20th century. Still, he worked his way through the University of Wyoming and Yale and became absorbed by statistics as a way to solve problems. After World War II, he shared his ideas on efficiency with Japanese manufacturers eager to rebuild their shattered economy. The Japanese used that knowledge to flip the global economy on its head and beat U.S. industry at its own game.
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